Hoffman Thermal Audits Provide Solutions to Cool Electronics and Maximize Equipment Life

Hoffman thermal audit maximizes equipment life

Summer’s coming, and the time to begin protecting your electronics, before it’s too late, is today. As temperatures rise, industrial electronics can overheat, causing malfunction and even complete device failure. In fact, statistics show that for every 18°F over room temperature, the life expectancy of an electronic device drops by 50%.

To determine thermal heat loads, and examine the stress placed on electrical devices by excess heat, Steiner is offering a FREE THERMAL AUDIT to be conducted by its Hoffman-trained and certified expert.

A thermal audit can identify problem areas and produce compelling evidence of excess heat that can affect performance and potentially damage critical equipment.

Are Your Electronics in Danger?

Keeping electronics cool is essential to maximizing the life cycle of electronic devices, reducing mean time between failures (MTBF), cutting capital expenses, and keeping production humming along.

Heat is generated internally by electronic components and intensified by external sources. Inside a cabinet, uncooled components can generate as much trapped heat as a home furnace.

Heat sources include:

  • AC power supplies
  • Controllers, drives and servos
  • Transformers and rectifiers
  • Processors and server racks
  • Radio equipment
Thermal energy from an electrical enclosure is measured during a thermal audit.

To cool the electronic and its components, the thermal energy must be transferred away from the device. There are a few basic ways to cool industrial enclosures, including using a sealed enclosure that utilizes a heat exchanger, an A/C unit that uses a fan to circulate fresh air through a cabinet, or via conductive cooling in which the heat radiates through the cabinet.

Without these measures, temperature variations can lead to everything from nuisance problems to shutdowns. Tripping can become a source of frustration, and heat stress can affect loop controllers, PLCs and more.

At high temperatures, drive performance can be derated, and I/C-based devices can behave strangely creating unusual output such as voltage fluctuation. At low temperatures, cooling below the dew point can lead to condensation and promote corrosion.

For instance, MOSFET transistors, which are voltage-controlled field effect transistors made from metal oxide and silicon components, can falter from excess heat. High temperatures can change the properties of the silicon oxide. The higher the temperature, the higher the threshold voltage that triggers an open gate. At too high of a temperature, the gate may not open at all.

Another potential heat-related hazard pertains to wiring insulation. With increasing temperatures, elasticity and strength of the insulation are reduced, and ductility can temporarily increase.

What is Tested During an Audit

When a facility is audited, the inspector looks at all the factors that could affect temperature increase. Typically, a Hoffman thermal audit examines:

  • Heat load of enclosed electrical equipment
  • Temperature ratings of the installed equipment (upper and lower limits)
  • Ambient temperature (typical and extreme)
  • Environmental conditions
    – Clean air (Type 1)
    – Dirty or wet environment (Type 12, Type 4/4X)
    – Closed- or open-loop cooling systems
    – Indoor or outdoor enclosure location
  • Maintenance and frequency of access requirements

When finished, a report is developed that will provide recommended thermal management solutions. These best practices are designed to keep electronic components cool and help minimize unplanned failures.

A thermal audit helps determine best practices for managing thermal energy.
A thermal audit helps determine best practices for managing thermal energy. Free Hoffman Thermal Audits are available from Steiner Electric.

Essentially, by removing the waste heat, efficiency can be increased while downtime and operating costs are reduced.

Allowing electronic components to run hot can be a gamble that could require a company to prematurely replace industrial drives, cause hours of automation system downtime, and create out-of-warranty conditions when cooling is not used.

Authorized Distributor

As an authorized distributor of Hoffman enclosure products, Steiner has a full-time, Hoffman-trained expert on staff. Hoffman is a leader in the design and manufacture of engineered thermal management systems for virtually any cooling application.

A thermal image captured during a thermal audit.

With Hoffman you get more than 100-combined years of thermal management engineering experience backed by extensive in-house test facilities that rigorously test computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, thermal cycling, salt fog, sound chamber and airflow.

Request your free Hoffman Thermal Audit, or for more information, please contact your Steiner Hoffman representative or call 1-800-STEINER (783-4637).

Schneider Electric Provides Safety Switches For Infinite Applications

Schneider’s Square D Safety switches are vital components to safety and power control. They are a means to disconnect from the electrical load and provide protection to the branch circuit.

When necessary, they can be used to disconnect manufacturing equipment, heavy machinery and light commercial and residential applications from its power source. Users may need to disconnect equipment from its electrical supply for a variety of reasons from scheduled preventive maintenance to emergency stoppage.

The performance of safety switches is important to the safe operation of many industrial applications. In addition, requirements from a variety of organizations  have increased the use of safety switches in many commercial and industrial facilities.

In addition, safety switches are an NEC requirement in industrial and manufacturing facilities.  For instance, a safety switch must be in sight from all motors or manufacturing equipment and not more than 50 feet from the equipment it controls.

A key performance benefit of the Schneider safety switch is its ability to break load. A locked motor can draw six to eight times motor full-load current. In an emergency situation, it’s important to have a safety switch with enhanced load-break features such as those featured in Schneider’s switches. A key element of Square D safety switches is its blade and jaw construction that has been designed to manage heavy motor loads and arc interruptions.

Multiple types of disconnect switches are available, and the switch that work for you depends on a number of factors in your working environment.  Steiner’s expertise can help make the appropriate choice. Steiner stocks a large inventory of safety switches ready for pickup at one of our convenient locations or on-time delivery to your facility or job site, including: general duty, heavy duty and double throw switches in single and multiple pole, fusible and non-fusible.

Here is a look at some of the most common safety switches.

General Duty Safety Switch
Schneider Electric Square D General Duty Safety Switch
General Duty Safety Switch

One of the most go-to safety switches are those that are considered General Duty (GD) safety switches. These are designed for residential and commercial applications and where durability and economy are prime considerations. Typical loads are lighting, air conditioning, and appliances. They are suitable for use as service equipment when equipped with a factory or field-installed neutral assembly or a field-installed service grounding kit as applicable.

  • Voltage: Maximum voltage of 240 V
  • Current Rating: Max amperage of 800 A
  • Enclosure: Available in Type 1 and Type 3R enclosures
  • Certification: UL Listed, File E2875
  • Standard: Meets or exceeds the NEMA Standard KS1
Heavy Duty Safety Switch
Schneider Electric Square D Heavy Duty Safety Switch
Heavy Duty Safety Switch

Visible blade heavy duty safety switches are designed for applications where maximum performance and continuity of service are required. All heavy duty safety switches feature a quick-make, quick-break operating mechanism, a dual-cover interlock and a color-coded indicator handle.

  • Voltage: Maximum voltage of 600 V (ac/dc)
  • Current Rating: Max amperage of 1200 A
  • Enclosure: Available in Type 1, Type 3R, Type 4, Type 4X, Type 5, Type 7, Type 9, Type 12 and Type 12K enclosures
Double Throw Safety Switch
Schneider Electric Square D Double Throw Safety Switch
Double Throw Safety Switch

Double throw safety switches are designed for manual transfer of one load between two power sources. The units are tough and reliable to provide emergency back-up power connections in accordance with Article 702 of the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70.

  • Voltage: Maximum voltage of 600 V (ac/dc)
  • Current Rating: Max amperage of 600 A
  • Enclosure: Available in Type 1, Type 3R, Type 4, Type 4X, Type 5 and Type 12 enclosures
Make Selections EZ

These safety-switch options, and others that are more specific in application, come with multiple options such as various difference in amperage and voltage. In some cases, the question is whether to use fusible or non-fusible switches.  Fusible safety switches combine fuses with the switch in a single enclosure. For both fusible and non-fusible safety switches, when the circuit is open, the safety switch disconnects the load from its source of power, while closing the circuit reconnects the load.

The Schneider Electric Safety Switch EZ Selector can guide you to the most appropriate safety switch for your required application.
The Safety Switch EZ Selector can guide you to the most appropriate safety switch for your required application.

With all the product variables from application to enclosure type, voltage to amperage applications, selecting the appropriate safety switch can be a challenge. Schneider Electric has made the process simpler by developing the EZ Selector system.

The EZ Selector tools ask simple “click-to-answer questions,” and the user is self-guided through a process that ultimately leads to the right product for the application.

Order online or call 1-800-STEINER (783-4637) to speak with a Steiner sales representative for more information on Schneider Square D Safety Switches.

Get a Free Carthartt Jacket or Utility Cart with Steiner Promo

Steiner promo for tools and equipment

An MRO or electrical contractor has to be prepared for just about any contingency, and being prepared often means having the right tool. The good news is that Steiner has a broad inventory of tools, tool accessories and equipment for you, and the better news is that from now until March 15, 2018, if you buy tools, equipment and tool accessories from select manufacturers, you may be eligible to receive a free Carhartt jacket or a utility cart.

If you purchase $1,000 or more in tools, tool accessories or equipment from the select manufacturers below, you will receive a free Carhartt jacket. If you purchase more than $2,500 in tools, tool accessories or equipment from those companies, you can receive a free utility cart. The special promotion runs through March 15, 2018. Limit one offer per customer. While supplies last.

Choose from these select manufacturers:

POWER TOOLSHAND TOOLSCAPITAL EQUIPMENT
MilwaukeeKlein ToolsGreenlee
DeWaltIdealMaxis
LENOX

Here are just a few examples of the products available from our leading manufacturers:

  • Pliers
  • Screwdrivers and nut drivers
  • Wire strippers
  • Fishing tools
  • Cable/wire pullers
  • Conduit/pipe benders
  • Power drills and drivers, hammer/drills, impact drivers
  • Driller/drive combinations
  • Power saws/band saws
  • Hole saw kits
  • Blades, bits and other accessories

EZ Ways to Select Schneider Pushbuttons

Emergency stops. Restarts. Line changes. These and other functions have at least one thing in common: pushbuttons.

Pushbuttons are relatively simple devices. At their most basic, the literal push-a-button to facilitate change, they open and close circuits. They can start an industrial process, stop it, or perform other predetermined functions that humans, interacting with machines, deem necessary.

Schneider's new 30 mm pushbutton is at the forefront of the industry.
Schneider’s new 30 mm pushbutton is at the forefront of the industry.

While simple, they are not simplistic. First, there are literal pushbuttons such as the 30 mm from Schneider (pictured), and then there are sibling products in the pushbutton family such as pilot lights and selector switches.

Then there are the many options available. Many, many options in some cases.

To help its customers, Schneider Electric and Steiner Electric have combined to make things a little easier with new pushbutton selector tools.

At the Forefront of Pushbuttons

First, what are all these options?

Today’s pushbuttons are modular in nature and can be augmented with application-specific accessories that can turn them into aesthetically pleasing, easy-to-use human-machine interface (HMI) components. They can be used in a galaxy of applications from pristine production to harsh process environments and integrated into stand-alone machinery or sophisticated, multi-purpose assembly lines … just about any industry with operations that have been automated, but still require some human intervention is an appropriate use.

Schneider Electric is a leader in pushbuttons, including the Harmony line which is distributed by Steiner Electric. The pushbuttons and signaling devices come in a range of styles that provide easy and reliable operations for industrial applications.

In this Schneider video, Jim Clark, Marketing Director Control and Signaling, says that Harmony offers the best-in-class pushbuttons, pilot lights, and switches on the market.

Harmony pushbuttons, which comply with all international standards, have been designed for OEMs, system integrators, panel builders, and others that build, repair, or customize machinery. For them, Schneider offers a unique and unrivaled depth of push-buttons, pilot lights and switches on the market, Clark says.

Visitors to the EZ Selectors page can create a semi-custom pushbutton designed for their specific application.
Various components and accessories for the Harmony 9001K 30 mm pushbutton.

One of the newest products, and an industry game changer, is the 30 mm Harmony pushbutton that expands on its 22-mm version. The 9001 30mm products include pushbuttons, pilot lights, selector switches, and mushroom head buttons. The rugged 9001 operators can feature chrome-plate bezels, black plastic bezels for corrosion-resistant applications, chrome-plated square bezels that provide multi-function operation, and many, many other options. Contacts, profiles, and additional options can be swapped out for something more appropriate.

So how is selection simpler?

Visitors to the EZ Selectors page can create a semi-custom pushbutton designed for their specific application.
Visitors to the EZ Selectors page can create a semi-custom pushbutton designed for their specific application.

With all these options selecting the appropriate pushbutton can be a challenge. Schneider Electric has made the process simpler by developing the EZ Selectors system.

The EZ Selector tools ask simple “click-to-answer questions,” and the user is self-guided through a process that ultimately leads to the right product for the application.

For instance, from the main EZ selector page, users can go to a product subset such as the 30-mm pushbutton or emergency stop product. From there, they can drill down into the various options to find the appropriate component.

Do you want, chromium-plated metal or plastic as the bezel material? Do you want the operator profile to be projecting, recessed or flush? The lens color can be any of 7 colors in one model or just black, green and red for another.

Once you’ve selected your needed product you can add it to your shopping cart. That is where Steiner Electric comes in. We will facilitate the purchase and either deliver the part or allow you the option to pick it up in one of our 8 conveniently located Will-Call Counters.

To see how it all works, give it try!

 

 

 

 

Siemens Circuit Breaker Expands Design Possibilities

Siemens 3VA Molded Case Circuit Breakers

A circuit breaker such as the Siemens new 3VA molded case circuit breaker line is an essential piece of safety equipment that protects critical infrastructure from the harmful effects of short circuits and overloads.

MCCBs rank among the most important safety components in low voltage power distribution.  An estimated 30 million MCCBs are installed each year around the globe.

Siemens 3VA5 molded case circuit breaker.

The new UL-certified series of 3VA molded case circuit breakers from Siemens was designed for low-voltage power distribution in buildings, infrastructure, and industrial applications. But the line was not just designed to protect devices today, but to grow as applications demand and needs change.

Siemens 3va electrical circuit breaker line is built around a modular concept with a variety of models and accessories.

Steiner Electric has placed in inventory Siemens 3VA products that meets the needs of Chicago-area contractors, electricians, MROs, OEM personnel and more.

The 3VA Family

This wide-ranging list of devices include multiple circuit breaker types, auxiliary switches and alarms, a variety of trip options, and the lugs and wire connectors that keep it all together.

 

Siemens 3VA5 circuit breakers are available in 125 A and 250 A
Siemens 3VA5 circuit breakers are available in 125 A and 250 A frames with a variety of options for each.

Steiner offers these breaker boxes based on two Siemens 3VA5 frame families.

  • The 125 A frame is a 3-pole breaker box with 25 kA @ 480 V interruption rating that come in models that trip at 15 A, 20 A, 50 A, 100 A, and 125 A.
  • The 250 A frame has a 35kA @480 V interruption rating, and trip circuits are rated at 150 A, 200 A, 225 A, and 250 A.

Both devices require minimum space because of their compact design. The footprint for the 3VA5 125 A frame model is 3 in. by 3.8 x 5.5 in. and the footprint for the 250 A frame is 4.13 in. x 4.21 x 7.28 in.

Safe Tripping

For safe operation, the 3VA5 Siemens circuit breakers are based on the concept of thermal magnetic trip units (TMTUs). These TMTUs are two separate tripping mechanisms – thermal and magnetic—that are built into the same device.

In a thermal-magnetic circuit breaker, the trip unit includes elements designed to sense the heat resulting from an overload condition and the high current resulting from a short circuit.

The thermal safety component works on thermal inverse-time, meaning the higher the current, the faster the breaker trips. The thermal element is a bimetallic strip, which means it has two different metals bonded together that have different thermal expansion characteristics. As that strip warms up, the thermal differences cause the metals to twist and bend and eventually contact a trip bar causing the contacts to spring open.

The second safety component is the magnetic trip. The circuit breaker has a trip unit that senses a magnetic field generated by current to detect a short circuit. This type of circuit breaker trips immediately when a short circuit occurs, but delays an appropriate amount of time before tripping in the event of an overload.

Array of Design Options

Steiner offers a wide range of Siemens’ internal accessories that can fit in any of the 3VA products. They can be adapted flexibly, quickly and easily to individual specifications. Color coded for simple installation process, they are designed to always be installed at the correct position in the circuit breaker.

A door mounted rotary operator. Just one of the many options available from Steiner.
A door mounted rotary operator. Just one of the many options available from Steiner.

Accessories include multiple operator options, including door mounted rotary operators that come either with illumination, which provides a clear indication of the switching position, and without an illuminating kit.

Also available is the Max Flex flange mount operating system that allows the user to locate the circuit breaker almost anywhere within an enclosure. It uses a flexible cable that connects to a breaker operator mechanism and a handle located on the enclosure’s flange.

Also available are auxiliary and alarm switches that can be integrated with all sizes of Siemens breakers. The switches snap for easy installation and to swap out as needs change.

3VA9, UL, UVR undervoltage release
The Siemens 3VA9, undervoltage release switch.

Auxiliary switches can be used to operate indicator lights, relays or other accessories to provide the breaker’s status. Alarm switches indicate that the circuit breaker has tripped due to an overload, short circuit or ground fault. A shunt trip will trip a breaker remotely, and an under voltage trip release will activate when voltage shuts off or dips.

So, when looking to install new or replacement breakers, consider the 3VA5 products that offer myriad design possibilities.

Schneider Electric Acquires ASCO Power Technologies

Schneider Electric, a global specialist in energy management and automation, has acquired Asco Power Technologies, a leader in the Automatic Transfer Switch  market, for $1.25 billion.

ASCO employs 2,000 people, mainly in North America, and operates 7 manufacturing sites.  ASCO introduced ATS in 1925 and later expanded into surge, loadbanks, and fire pump and control applications. Since December 2016, ASCO has been operating as a autonomous part of Vertiv (formerly Emerson Network Power).

ATS automatically transfers critical loads from the primary source of power to the back-up power source in the event of a power outage. The Asco switches are designed specifically to meet regulations and power voltages used in the U.S.
According to the company, with the addition of the ASCO portfolio, Schneider Electric’s EcoStruxure Power Platform is further enhanced in North America and around the world especially in terms of applications in healthcare, financial services, data centers and other critical buildings.

How To Use Social Media to Benefit Your Company

June 30th is Social Media Day. In honor of the special occasion we will reflect on some interesting and successful social campaigns being implemented across popular social channels by three different brands. The following campaigns provide great examples of effective uses of social media (Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and YouTube) any company can beneficially emulate to drive customer engagement.

CARHARTT 

Carhartt has campaigns across Facebook and Twitter that allow interactivity for fans and followers – for example, hashtag contests like #OutWorkThemAll encourage users to share photos of themselves working on tough projects while wearing Carhartt gear.

carhartoutworkthemall

Carhartt engineers consistency across Twitter and Facebook, with many similar campaign attributes being utilized in both networks. Hashtag campaigns like #OutWorkThemAll thrive cross-network, sharing photos of customers and products, providing Carhartt with a cost-effective grassroots promotional product campaign.

Carhartt also actively posts several videos and playlists on YouTube – one of which is the helpful “Do-It-Yourself” series of videos. These instructional videos provide customers with an easy guide of how to use products or how to complete tasks. They help answer customers’ questions giving Carhartt a practical extension to their customer service operations.

diy carhartt


PHILIPS LIGHTING

Photos of Philips lights and lamps used for illuminating the exterior of buildings around the world are displayed on Twitter. Philips’ Twitter account shares colorful lighting photos that showcase the latest innovations from the lighting industry. Philips also shares articles from magazines, promoting stories that feature Philips products and services. Sharing these publications gives Philips positive recognition from third-party trusted sources.

Philips Lighting’s Facebook page contains contests, such as a chance to win Philips and Star Wars lights by simply telling them what makes your child a Star Wars fan. Philips also shares images of LED lights in use, such as in the Amsterdam Arena.

philips facebook led

facebook philips

With several videos, from “How To” demonstrations to featured products, there are numerous choices available for viewing on the Philips YouTube channel. The “How To” videos provide guidance, while the featured products showcase the range of innovative products that Philips Lighting offers.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fj8OBmoE3uQ

As a worldwide company Philips also localizes their videos by translating them into several languages catering to the copious local markets they serve, which means you’ll find many Philips videos offered in multiple languages.

Philips additionally shares invitations for seminars and webinars through LinkedIn, encouraging more participation from readers and followers. The free seminars offer pertinent information on relevant and timely industry topics providing continuing education on practical applications of the latest trends.

Posting a variety of useful and timely content on social media networks – from current event related information on community outreach initiatives – to featuring new products – to event invitations – to contests – provides information that is helpful and engaging to your target audience. Having customers continually return to engage with your brand underscores the importance of utilizing social media to capture mindshare that ultimately leads to market share.

Additionally, another benefit of being active on social media is interaction – not only with customers but with other companies that are also present and active on social media. This allows for the potential of cross-promoting each other to audiences, sharing to each customer base, as well as creating the opportunity for building a working relationship between the two (or more) interacting companies.

There are countless strategies and uses for social media that any company can benefit in, but even simply being active and maintaining a presence online (answering customer feedback or questions) is advantageous to any brand. In this digital age, more customers and prospective customers flock to the internet to learn more about a company, or to just find a brand for their particular interest or need, therefore it is absolutely essential to be ready and represented online.

Applications of Switchgear and Switchboards

switchgear vs switchboard

The terms “switchboard” and “switchgear” are interchangeable to engineers and architects. While they are in fact, interchangeable, they do both have distinct differences that are worth noting. These differences include configurations, components, reliability, standards and applications.

One of the major differences between switchboards and switchgear is the type of breakers that are used. The basic types are sealed, semi-open and open types. Specifically, these are called molded case, insulated case and power circuit breakers.

Molded case circuit breakers (MCCBs) are often used in all types of low-voltage switchboards and panelboards. These breakers can be found in ratings from 15 amps to 3,000 amps.

SQD JDL36200
Molded Case Circuit Breaker – MCCB

The breaker mechanism is sealed inside of the external molded case. If the breaker has a failure then it is to be replaced. These breakers are typically bolted onto the bus, or may have plug-in designs. The removal or addition of MCCBs to a switchboard must ONLY occur when the switchboard is turned off.

Power circuit breakers have ratings that range from 800 amps to 5,000 amps. PCBs are tested with different standards from MCCBs or ICCBs. They are attached to the bus in a drawout design, which allows the breakers to be withdrawn partially or fully while the entire switchgear is powered on. They have various components that are inspected and replaced. These components include arc chutes, contacts and pole assemblies.

To understand the differences between Switchboards and Switchgear, we will need to look at several variable considerations – Maintainability, Economics, System Coordination, Size and Project Application.

(Note: this article will cover circuit breaker type switchboards as compared to switchgear, and though some engineers may have a preference for fusible switchboards, this would get into fuses vs. circuit breakers, a topic for another discussion)

MAINTAINABILITY

Switchgear has the type of maintainable steel frame breakers which you are able to draw out. Switchgear also has mechanisms that draw out or rack out on racking arms. The main reason to use switchgear over switchboards is due to the ease of maintenance. Switchgear is more maintainable – this is due to the breakers that are used. Air circuit breakers are used in switchgear and insulated or molded case breakers are used in switchboards.

Switchgear incorporates low voltage power circuit breakers – abbreviated to LVPCB. Steel framed LVPCB’s have heavy-duty metal frames that are designed for ease of maintenance.

On the other hand, plastic-enclosed breakers must be disassembled to access the operating mechanisms, which makes it more complicated to maintain. In addition to this, plastic-enclosed breakers – if not requiring disassembling, would need to be unsealed to get to the internal components.

ECONOMICS

As in other applications, the economics are an important area to focus on. In many instances the initial factor that a potential customer or buyer reviews is the installed cost.

Group mounted switchboards tend to be less costly, while the individually mounted switchboards are about 15 to 50% more than group mounted switchboards. This all depends on the number and type of devices that are required. Typically, you will find that switchgear is more expensive than individually mounted switchboards.

SYSTEM COORDINATION

LVPCB’s don’t need an instantaneous trip function to be built in. Main and feeder breakers, likewise can be built without the instantaneous trip function.

Without it, main, feeders and other downstream devices are able to be more freely coordinated. Switchgear is more sophisticated in its trip functionality than switchboard breakers. This allows for a higher degree of coordination.

Circuit Breaker Maintenance
Circuit Breaker Basics

 SIZE

Another important consideration is the size. Switchgear is larger because of the rear access that is necessary for cable terminations, while switchboard construction is smaller and usually requires front access because of the group mounted circuit breaker arrangement.

Some applications are restricted in space, thus, a group-mounted switchboard is the only option. If the equipment needs to be against the wall, thereby eliminating the option for rear access, then the only alternative is group-mounted switchboards that allow for front-accessible terminations.

Group mounted switchboards require the use of molded case breakers as feeders. Because of this, the density can be greater and the overall width would be less. Applications that require higher levels of reliability, maintainability or remote operation need to be designed to allow for rear access of that gear.

PROJECT APPLICATION

Some projects require the use of switchgear, while other projects would be better suited with switchboards. An example of this is schools and the healthcare industry. Power to a school would not be as critical as that to a hospital.

The ability to precisely coordinate breakers allows for enhanced power integrity, thus preventing nuisance trips, resulting in reduced outages. For instance, hospitals require more reliable and dependable power due to the urgency of the industry, since lives are involved and operating tables are used.

operating tables
Power is essential for Hospitals

A switchboard that has a size and cost advantage is suited well for a school, while the switchgear may be better for the hospital. In either case, it would be beneficial to look at the location or project and determine what would be the best option on a case-by-case basis.