Holocaust Survivor Magda Brown Tells Her Story to Steiner Employees and Their Families

On May 18, 2019 Steiner had the honor to host Holocaust survivor Magda Brown for 100 employees and their families, ranging in ages from 12 to 70.  Born in Hungary in 1927, Magda was sent to Auschwitz in 1944 at the age of 17. Magda has spoken to over 100,000 people the past 15 years throughout the country and internationally. Listening to Magda speak was an incredible experience, she is truly an inspiration to all of us and a reminder that we must NEVER FORGET what happened. Hers is an incredible story of courage and strength.

Even after experiencing horrendous torture and imprisonment her message was: “Have Faith, Fantasy, Drive and Believe that tomorrow will be better. Next to health, the next best thing is freedom, and think before you hate.”

Reflections from Some Who Attended

Thank you so much for yesterday!  Magda Brown is an incredible, strong person and I consider a hero to mankind.  This was an honor to listen to her yesterday and both Jamie and I just want to thank you and your family for allowing us that time to listen to her story!

Thanks, Tom Zapp


Thank you again for allowing us to participate in the Magda Brown presentation.  Magda really is a living lesson in poise and grace.  Kaelin and I both left on Saturday in a completely different mindset than when we walked in.  I have overheard Kae talking to her friends about the experience all weekend.  She was really moved by what she heard and in speaking to Ms. Brown after the event.

Again, we are very thankful to have been able to come and participate in something we feel is so important.

Dawn Thomas


I wanted to thank you for having Magda as a speaker on Saturday.  I have been thinking about it ever since.  What a strong wonderful woman.  She didn’t show any bitterness which amazed me.  I would be bitter forever.

Thanks again, Bernie Eadon


I wanted to thank you for the opportunity to listen to Magda’s story this past Saturday. Being part of the “last generation” that can listen to and learn from these stories directly from someone who survived the Holocaust, was an incredible experience. The way Magda described her adolescence pre WW2, the Holocaust, and the events that led her to be enslaved at Auschwitz and then transported somewhere in East Germany assembling poisonous gas was remarkable. The vividness in which Magda described the selection process and how she was separated from her mother, was sad, and heartbreaking. Simple pleasures were gone, like a shower, toiletries, shoes, clothes, and basic human decency. The precision in which the Germans conducted the work labor camps, was shocking and disturbing. Yet, throughout all these horrors and atrocities and being poisoned, Magda never lost her faith and her desire to keep dreaming and fighting. The manner in which Magda speaks and keeps her composure is elegant and joyful, to say the least. I also enjoyed her ending and reminding “the last generation” it is our responsibility to stand up to the bullies and make them our friends and to understand their point of view. They may have a broken home, or their own shortcomings, and may have been taught to show intolerance to different viewpoints and cultures.  Magda reminded us nothing is black and white, except for what is right and wrong. There are good people and bad people in this world, but there are always more good people than bad. A key takeaway from Magda’s story was “Next to your health, freedom is just as important”.  This mantra resonates loud and clear, especially when paired with the poem Magda shared with the audience. We must not allow history to repeat itself and we do this by sharing Magda’s story with our friends and family.

Sincerely, Elmer Jovel

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