CoroTurn Prime Revolutionary Turning Tool Cuts Across Many Directions

Sandvik Coromant Introduces CoroTurn Prime and Prime Turning

When Sandvik Coromant released a video in support of its new PrimeTurning™ turning technology, the video almost appeared to be going in reverse. The cutting tool traversing from chuck to the end of the workpiece. Had it been going in reverse, however, material would have magically gone back on the blank, as opposed to the long strips of material being removed first along one axis and then another.

PrimeTurning is a new turning method that enables turning in all directions. Unlike conventional turning operations, PrimeTurning allows machine shops, OEMs and other users to complete longitudinal facing and profiling operations with a single tool. In addition to the prime turning technology, the company released two types of tooling, an A-type for fine finishing and a B-type for roughing applications.

With this forward-and-back cutting capability, and its innovative tooling technology, Sandvik Coromant believes that some applications could achieve productivity increases of more than 50% as compared to conventional techniques.

For instance, Cutting Tool Engineering magazine reported on an Italian manufacturer who reduced the cycle time for machining a shaft from 2.42 to 1.36 minutes and extended the tool life per edge from four pieces to nine by using the PrimeTurning system.

According to the report, a competitor’s conventional insert ran at a cutting speed of 150 m/min., a feed rate of 0.012 ipr, and a DOC of 0.079 in. By contrast, the CoroTurn® Prime B-type roughing insert ran at double the cutting speed and DOC, and a feed of 0.032 ipr when turning forged, ASTM B564 nickel alloy with a hardness of 250 HB.

Major reasons for the reported success of the PrimeTurning technology is due to the small entering angle relative to the feed direction, as well as a higher lead angle that allows the user to cut substantially faster. The turning operation creates thinner, wider chips that spread the load and heat away from the nose radius. In addition, as cutting is performed in the direction moving away from the shoulder, there is no danger of chip jamming, which can occur if chips are pushed against the shoulder during turning.

Entering and lead angles:
A-type KAPR = 30°, PSIR = 60°
B-type KAPR = 25°, PSIR = 65°

“Experienced operators know that a small entering angle allows for increased feed rates,” said Håkan Ericksson, Global Product Specialist at Sandvik Coromant. “However, in conventional turning they are restricted to using entering angles of around 90 degrees to reach the shoulder and avoid the long, curved chips that a small entering angle characteristically delivers. PrimeTurning solves these problems by combining a perfect reach at the shoulder and the application of 25 degrees to 30 degrees entering angles with excellent chip control and maintained tolerances. This innovation presents countless possibilities to perform turning operations in much more efficient and productive ways. It’s not just a new tool, but a totally new way of turning.”

Supporting Technologies

PrimeTurning is supported by the introduction of two dedicated CoroTurn Prime turning tools, part of the CoroTurn insert tooling line, and the PrimeTurning code generator, which supplies optimized programming codes and techniques.

The PrimeTurning methodology and CoroTurn Prime A-type tool (left) and B-type (right) enable turning in all directions.
The PrimeTurning methodology and CoroTurn Prime A-type tool (left) and B-type (right) enable turning in all directions.

The new turning tools include:

  • The CoroTurn Prime A-type tool with three 35° corners designed for light roughing, finishing and profiling.
  • The CoroTurn Prime B-type tool with strong corners designed for rough machining.

Suitable for ISO P (steel), S (heat-resistant super alloys and titanium) and M (stainless steel) category materials, nine CoroTurn Prime A-type and six CoroTurn Prime B-type inserts are currently available, with expansion to other material​s envisioned for the future. The inserts are supported by 52 variants of tool holder, including Coromant Capto®​, CoroTurn QS and shanks.​

The ​CoroTurn Prime inserts feature three edges per corner. One edge each for longitudinal, facing and profiling thus distributing the wear over a longer edge and not just the insert tip. It also moves heat away from the cutting zone that helps inserts last substantially longer.

Sanvik Coromant also developed a Code Generator to develop specialized toolpath strategies and take full advantage of CoroTurn Prime insert design.  The generator supplies programming codes and techniques to set up maximum parameters and variables for a particular application to secure maximum output in ISO P steels, ISO M stainless steels and ISO S heat-resistant super alloy (HRSA) materials.

Steiner’s Hobart Branch Hosts 8th Annual Super Tool Tent Sale

Hobart Branch's 8th Annual Huge Tool Tent Sale

Tools looking a little battered, a little rusty, perhaps gone missing from your tool box? Just like handling and owning some of the newest tools on the market from some of the industry’s leading brands? If so, come out to the Hobart (Ind.) Branch of Steiner Electric for its 8th Annual Super Tool Tent Sale and achieve fantastic savings on a variety of tools.

This once-a-year, big-white-tent sale runs from 3:30pm to 6:30pm on Aug. 3 and includes free food. Find great deals on hand and power tools spread throughout 1350 sq. ft. of tent space from vendors, including:

3M
Burndy
Fluke
Greenlee
Ideal Industries
Klein Tools
Lenox
Milwaukee
Panduit
RAB Lighting
Streamlight

In addition to great products, enjoy great food cooked on-site by district branch manager, and grill cook, Brent Stack who will be serving up burgers and hot dogs for our customers. Thirst quenching soft drinks and water will also be available.

View this flyer for more information.

Safety Notice: Milwaukee Expands Warnings on M18 Battery Pack

Milwaukee Tool is voluntarily expanding the warnings and instructions of its M18™ HIGH DEMAND™ 9.0 battery pack (model no. 48-11-1890).  The expanded product warnings, made in consultation with the Consumer Product Safety commission, addresses situations that could lead to a battery pack failure or other safety hazards.  This safety notice does not require users to return their M18™ HIGH DEMAND™ 9.0 battery packs.

Should highly conductive or corrosive fluids get inside the M18™ HIGH DEMAND™ 9.0 battery pack in sufficient quantities, it can cause battery pack failure.

Milwaukee Electric issues safety notice.
Milwaukee Tool issues safety notice.

Failure can include, a short-circuit that, in an extreme situation, can result in smoking or fire, even when not in use. Examples of highly conductive or corrosive fluids include seawater, certain industrial chemicals and bleach or bleach-containing products.

Milwaukee Tool is urging its customers to download, read and understand the expanded warnings and instructions in their entirety at milwaukeetool.com/safetynotices, where they will also find frequently asked questions and answers.

Milwaukee Tool is urging its customers to download, read and understand the expanded warnings and instructions in their entirety at www.milwaukeetool.com/expandedinstructions

Any customers who believe highly conductive or corrosive fluids have entered their M18™ HIGH DEMAND™ 9.0 battery pack should immediately contact Milwaukee Tool at 844.577.5515 (7am to 10pm Eastern Time Sunday through Saturday).

Choosing The Right Fastener Depends On The Intended Application

Deciding on the right fastener is a vital part to completing a successful job. Various projects can require the use of several different types of fasteners, such as nails, screws, nuts, bolts, and anchors.

The use of a wide variety of fasteners has a long history – for instance, what resembles a modern-day screw is thought to have been around since about the 3rd century BC in Greece and by the 1st century BC, wooden screws were often used in the Mediterranean world. Nails are thought to have been created in ancient Egypt around 3400 BC.

fasteners

In this article we’ll cover a summary of some of the most commonly used fasteners – particularly, screws, nails, anchors, staples, nuts and bolts. Additionally, examples of applications will be provided to help offer direction on how to choose the right type of fastener for use on a particular project.

Fasteners and Their Applications

Screws

Different types of screws are used for differing job applications. For instance, some types of screws might be more suited for outdoor projects manufactured to withstand certain elements. In other applications screws can be utilized in areas that are not meant to be visible providing a cleaned finished exterior look.

Steiner has several types of screws available – from anchor screws, cap screws, locking screws, drive screws, eye screws and more. The advantage of screws is that they securely hold in place, rarely loosen, and can also be easily removed when need be.

Screws have a variety of different types of heads – for example, Pan heads are one of the most common types of heads that are found on a screw. They are rounded and have short vertical sides that provide a low profile once they are driven into a surface. Flat heads are countersunk and designed to sit low in the surface which the screw is drilled into.

Oval heads provide a combination of pan and flat head types with the head being slightly rounded. The oval head provides a more decorative finish. Truss heads have rounded tops with a large and flat underside. This provides a very low profile that still stays above the line of the surface.

heads

Just as the type of screw used depends on the application or project – likewise, the type of nail used depends on the application. Like screws, some nails are for use indoors and others outdoors.

Nails

Nails can be easily installed – using an air gun makes installing nails even easier. Nails provide a low cost and are useful for construction projects such as securing cabinets and shelving or installing roof panels.

There are two general rules that can help with the selection of the type of nail that can be used in any given project. The first is that the nail should be at least 3 times the length of the material that the nail will be nailing through. For example, if you are nailing 1/2″ sheathing on an exterior wall you should use a nail that is at least 1 1/2″ long. 1/2″ x 3 = 1 ½″. The second rule is that the nail used should be able to penetrate the item being nailed to and not completely go through it. Using the same example of a ½” sheathing, you will need a nail that will be 1 ¼” long. ¾” + ½” = 1 ¼”.

Bolts

Bolts are to be used when nails aren’t applicable and screws don’t provide a strong enough hold. A bolt is a type of screw that is used for holding together objects, while the nut is a small metal object that is fastened to the bolt. Nuts and bolts are almost always used together. Nuts and bolts are extremely secure and have a high load bearing.

When a bolt runs through the nut, it creates a strong bond that is able to handle great amounts of stress. Sizes vary for multiple types of projects. To tighten bolts and nuts, tools will be required. They can also be easily removed.

fastener-images

Anchors

Anchors come in several different types – there are concrete anchors, pipe anchors, screw anchors, wall anchors and wedge anchors. Anchors are usable for projects involving walls. Many types of anchors can be used to join wood or metal with concrete, mortar, brick, tile or stone.

Staples

Staples are another common fastener used in construction projects. The crown of a staple can bridge materials that are butted together. The crown also provides a bigger surface area than other fasteners, which can be helpful with thin materials.

While staples can be installed very quickly and serve as a great temporary fastener, they also have the added convenience of being loosened or removed easily. Staples can be inserted through the use of a staple gun. Some staple guns use arched staples for fastening small cables, e.g. phone or TV, without damaging the cable.

Planning any construction or building project involves several factors. Choosing the right fasteners is a key component to completing a successful project. Before purchasing fasteners, contractors should understand the intended application for each type of fastener to ensure their proper use. Additionally, with the right fastener, finding the right tool is also a necessity before starting construction.

Steiner has a wide selection of fasteners in addition to the tools needed to properly install those fasteners. Find tools and fasteners on www.steinerelectric.com or visit your nearest Steiner location.